Archive for the ‘Books’ Category

My Book Reviews

February 19th, 2016 No comments
The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen by Kwame Anthony Appiah

The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen by Kwame Anthony Appiah

I enjoy reading a lot. It’s a lot like eating, which I also enjoy a lot. They’re both about nourishment. One for the mind. The other for, well, let’s not go there.

My reading is across the board but mostly nonfiction. There is a very small number of novelists who I want to read, including mostly Virginia Woolf and Jane Austen. But there are others, and that’s for another time to consider.

I try to write reviews of the books I read. Reading books and writing about them helps me with my own writing. The same is true for keeping a journal, which I also try to do.

Anyway, all of this is leading me to say that you can read my book reviews here on this website and at Goodreads.

Yesterday, I published my latest review, which is about The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen by Kwame Anthony Appiah. I was underwhelmed by it and you can read why here.


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Tom Regan and His Wife Nancy and Me

February 2nd, 2016 No comments
Nancy and Tom Regan and myself.

Nancy and Tom Regan and myself.

I first met Tom and Nancy Regan at the RSPCA’s Rights of Animals symposium at Trinity College Cambridge in 1977. Recently, I caught up with them at their home in Raleigh, NC.

Tom and Nancy always inspired me to learn as much as I can about animal rights and showed me the importance of ethical action as the capstone to our action for animals.

In 1977, I was the campaigns organiser at Compassion In World Farming. Compassion’s founder, Peter Roberts, took me to the RSPCA’s symposium. This was a special moment in the history of the animal rights movement. With the notable exception of Peter Singer, leading philosophers, advocates, authors, and politicians came together for two days to consider animal ethics and the emerging animal rights movement.

The Case for Animal Rights by Tom Regan (University of California Press; 1983)

The Case for Animal Rights by Tom Regan (University of California Press; 1983)

I was an angry young vegan who, unbeknown to myself, was beginning a career with some of the world’s leading animal rights organisations. Tom was already an acclaimed moral philosopher and a prominent speaker in animal rights. But not everyone present at the conference was a card carrying vegan animal rights advocate.

As I recall in my book, Growl, I remember Tom and Nancy, and Peter Roberts and myself, and other vegans being exiled to what was called the ‘vegetarian table’ in the college’s baronial dining hall. We were fed meagre rations of dull 1970s veggie food. Everyone else at the conference dined on venison that was the charred remains of body parts of deer who had once grazed Trinity College’s grounds. We ate our veggie food in disgust, tut tutting our fellow conference attendees and speakers.

Since then, Tom and Nancy’s and my life have crossed many times and, in particular, after I moved to the USA in 1987.

I heard Tom speak often at animal rights conferences throughout America. He was always an inspirational speaker. In particular, I appreciated how he situated a commitment to nonviolence as central to his animal rights declaration.

The philosophy of animal rights stands for peace, and against violence. The fundamental demand of this philosophy is to treat humans and other nonhuman animals with respect. This philosophy, therefore, is a philosophy of peace. But it is a philosophy that extends the demand for peace beyond the boundaries of our species, for there is an undeclared war being waged everyday against countless millions of nonhuman animals.

His unique contribution to moral philosophy is, of course, much more than animal rights and particularly The Case for Animal Rights published in 1983. In addition to nonviolence, his writings on environmental ethics were instrumental in challenging environmentalists to consider animal rights.

Empty Cages by Tom Regan (Rowman & Littlefield; 2004)

Empty Cages by Tom Regan (Rowman & Littlefield; 2004)

The philosophy of animal rights demands only that the logic be respected for any argument that plausibly explains the independent value of human beings implies that other animal have the same value and have it equally. And any argument that plausibly explains the rights of humans to be treated with respect also implies that these other animals have the same rights and have it equally also.

With our respective organisations, the Animals and Society Institute and the Culture and Animals Foundation, we coproduced the International Compassionate Living Festival for a number of years.

Tom helped me to understand the importance of bringing together animal advocates with moral philosophers, authors and artists engaged in animal issues, and business leaders with musicians. Compassionate change is needed on many fronts, he always said.

Tom and Nancy and their fellow directors at the Culture and Animals Foundation work tirelessly since its foundation in 1985 to promote cultural change for animals.

By appealing to individual intellect, creativity and compassion, the Culture and Animals Foundation believes we can awaken people to the plight and grandeur of kindred animals–and ultimately build a deeper understanding of human-animal relationships and a greater respect for basic animal rights.

On Tom’s retirement the North Carolina State University established the Tom Regan Animal Rights Archive, which is the only archive of its kind in the world. Tom introduced me to the librarians and archivists at NCSU Libraries. Thanks to him, we convinced NCSU Libraries to accept the valuable collections I had established at the Animals and Society Institute. This included The Animal Rights Network Archive, The Animals’ Agenda Archive, the Argus Archives, the Animal Welfare Institute Archives, and the Claire Necker Collection of Cat Books and Collectibles.

Defending Animal Rights by Tom Regan (University of Illinois Press; 2001)

Defending Animal Rights by Tom Regan (University of Illinois Press; 2001)

As much as I am a republican and not a monarchist, Tom is the only person I would accept as a ruling monarch. King Tom would rule us as the very best of benign dictators. With one sweep of his hand across this realm he would stop people from eating meat, he would liberate animals from research laboratories, and he would inspire compassion for all.

What of democracy, may you ask? Its sacrifice would be a small price to pay.

But, thankfully, King Tom is not our ruler but he is the animal rights philosopher and elder statesman. But he is more than that as I consider him to be my friend and mentor. He continues to inspire me—personally and professionally—to work harder and better for animal rights.

It was great fun to spend the day with Tom and Nancy and reminisce the past and speculate the future of animal rights.

New to Tom Regan and want to learn more but unsure where to begin?

I recommend starting with his book Empty Cages: Facing the Challenge of Animal Rights (2004)  followed by Animal Rights Human Wrongs: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy (2003) and Defending Animal Rights (2001). There is a selection of videos of Tom Regan to watch on his website, too.

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What I Did During the Blizzard

January 24th, 2016 No comments
The weather forecast on one of Washington DC's TV channels predicted 20-30" of snow for the area.

The weather forecast on one of Washington DC’s TV channels predicted 20-30″ of snow for the area.

Presently, I’m working on an assignment with Alley Cat Allies, which means that I’m spending significant amounts of time in their Bethesda, MD offices. One of my trips coincided with the blizzard that occurred over the weekend of January 23-24. For the duration of the blizzard, the U.S. government advised people to stay indoors and not venture out. The blizzard started at 1pm on Friday and later that day I returned form the Alley Cat Allies office to the hotel where I’m staying. I write this as of Sunday afternoon. The blizzard has stopped but there are mountains of snow everywhere.

I have just spent two days not leaving my hotel room. I haven’t gone outside since Friday afternoon but I hope to take a walk later today. In any event, I will be going to the Alley Cat Allies nearby office tomorrow to work for the day. Prior to the storm, I stocked up with chips and salsa, cartons of soup, bread, salad, humous, instant oatmeal, coffee, orange juice, and soy milk. I cook with an electrical kettle and a microwave.

This was taken late Saturday afternoon as the storm got worse. It was windy and snowing all through Saturday evening and into early Sunday morning. The storm cleared by breakfast.

This was taken late Saturday afternoon as the storm got worse. It was windy and snowing all through Saturday evening and into early Sunday morning. The storm cleared by breakfast.

It’s been a bit weird to not go outside for two days and watch from my 11th floor window the blizzard raging outside. But, on the other hand, it’s been rather nice to have the time to myself, catch up on sleep, and, of course, work. Lying in bed this morning, I began to make a mental list of projects and tasks I had worked on in the last two days. This led me to getting up and writing a list, which is now turned into this post.

So, for those who want to know what I did in the 48+ hours of the blizzard, here’s your answer and in no particular order:

  • Finished reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. I had started reading it about four weeks ago but since then I’ve had long gaps when I hadn’t touch it. This is a novel that you have to concentrate on. I feel I haven’t benefitted from reading it as much as I should. This is the second time I’ve read it and the first time was also not conducive. What I would really like to do is to read Heart of Darkness without too many interruptions over a couple of days. Third time’s the charm?
  • Spoke with various friends via Skype and FaceTime.
  • Emailed and spoke with Becky Robinson at Alley Cat Allies about various ideas and projects.
  • Read six back copies of the London Review of Books and have a similar number to go.
  • Wrote in my journal.
  • Wrote and revised an appreciation of a key figure in the animal rights movement. The next step is to make a video file of myself reading it out.
  • Edited and prepared for publication for my client, Compassion In World Farming, an interview with a scholar. I also drafted a second interview with another scholar.
  • Listened to two podcasts from the Author MBA podcast, which I find interesting and full of useful advice to authors who ‘think like an entrepreneur and treat their books like a business.’
  • Listened to one podcast from the ARZone. The Animal Rights Zone podcast is excellent.
  • Answered email–there’s always email to answer.
  • Posted onto my social media throughout the blizzard photos taken from my hotel room and including some of them here.
  • Reviewed a proposal to revamp this website, which I hope to complete this spring.

Of course, I’m not making any claims of hardship here. I could not help but think of those outside–the homeless, dogs and cats, birds and wildlife and others–who had no choice.

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2015 and Me

January 14th, 2016 No comments

Ever wondered what I do, how I spend my time, and how I make a living? Now, you can find out by reading my annual review for 2015.

As we begin a New Year, which is my fortieth anniversary of being a vegan campaigning for animal rights, I look back on 2015 and my work as an independent scholar and author and consultant with client organisations in the U.K. and U.S.A.

I am very fortunate to be able to live a life in which I have been able to bring together both my personal commitment and professional experience to campaigning for a vegan, animal rights world. The work is not always easy as animal cruelty and exploitation are never far from my thoughts. But there is no other way that I would like to live my life.

So, click here to read about my work for animal rights in 2015.


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Brigid Brophy

October 14th, 2015 No comments
Brigid Brophy

Brigid Brophy

The University of Northampton, England, hosted the Brigid Brophy Anniversary Conference on October 9-10, 2015. The conference commemorated the twentieth anniversary of the death of Brigid Brophy (1929-1995) and the fiftieth anniversary of her article, ‘The Rights of Animals,’ published in the Sunday Times on October 10, 1965 (and later collected in the ground-breaking 1971 anthology, Animals, Men and Morals). The School of the Arts at the University of Northampton hosted the two-day conference to celebrate all aspects of Brophy’s literary career, as well as her leading contribution to animal rights, vegetarianism, anti-vivisectionism, humanism, feminism, and her advocacy of the Public Lending Right. The conference organiser was Professor Richard Canning. The following is the abstract and the paper I presented at the conference. The paper was called ‘A Felicitous Day for Fish.’ Click Brigid Brophy to learn more.

Here’s the link to the paper Brigid Brophy Anniversary Conference 2015 Presentation PDF I presented at the conference. And here’s the paper’s abstract:

In 1980, the RSPCA published the Report of the Panel of Enquiry into Shooting and Angling chaired by the distinguished zoologist, Lord Medway, which concluded that “vertebrate animals (i.e., mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish) should be regarded as equally capable of suffering to some degree or another, without distinction between ‘warm-blooded’ and ‘cold blooded’ members.” (para 286) The RSPCA was in turmoil during the 1970s and 1980s. Its policy on hunting symbolised the conflict between members who understood the society as only caring for cats and dogs and progressive members, inspired in part by Brigid Brophy’s 1965 article ‘The Rights of Animals,’ who opposed bloodsports and other forms of animal exploitation. The RSPCA subsequently adopted progressive policies, including opposition to bloodsports (but not angling), and banned hunters as ineligible for membership. These developments sent shockwaves through the British establishment, which continue to rumble to the present. The 2015 Conservative Party manifesto commits the government to ‘protect hunting, shooting and fishing’ and ‘give Parliament the opportunity to repeal the Hunting Act on a free vote, with a government bill in government time.’ Polls repeatedly show  majority public opinion opposed to hunting whereas angling is one of the country’s most popular past times, and is not an issue of concern for animal welfare organisations. The launch of the Council for the Prevention of Cruelty by Angling in London and its demise four years later may only warrant a footnote in the history of the animal welfare movement except that Brigid Brophy gave its inaugural address in 1981. As CPCA’s Patron, she called this a ‘felicitous day for fish’ and as CPCA’s Vice President I recall her speech with admiration for its courage, vision, and wit. Drawing from the CPCA file in my animal rights archive, my presentation will consider the context of the remarks made by Brophy about animal rights, including how she saw cruelty to fish in angling from the perspective of her ‘fellow Lefties’ demands for social justice’ and the ‘Right Wing’s concerns for the freedom of the individual.’

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Categories: Animal Rights, Books Tags: ,

Peace News reviews Growl

September 28th, 2015 No comments
Past issues of Peace News, stretching back over its 75 years of publication.

Past issues of Peace News, stretching back over its 75 years of publication.

The prestigious magazine, Peace News, publishes a review of Growl. Published since 1936, Peace News is the U.K.’s only grassroots newspaper covering the full spectrum of peace and justice issues and currently publish 6 bi-monthly issues a year. Peace News Ltd is a not-for-profit limited company.

Here’s a lengthy extract:

The four key values that are examined in Growl are compassion, truth, nonviolence and justice – values which are shared by most Peace News readers and anti-war campaigners. The author explores these themes and his own journey to becoming a genuinely compassionate activist. One of the concepts discussed in the book is that of ‘The Misanthropic Bunker’ (a place I‘m sure all passionate campaigners have some experience of). Stallwood describes it as a place of anger and hatred that vegans retreat to when the world of unremitting violence towards other animals becomes too much to cope with: “We’ll never achieve animal rights,” he tells himself. “Speciesism will never end. Animal rights will never be accomplished in my lifetime.”

Over the years, Stallwood learns that whilst there is a need for the misanthropic bunker to hide in once in a while, the way to avoid being consumed by hatred and intolerance is to exercise compassion and be kind to ourselves – and other humans – as well as to the non-human animals he campaigns on behalf of.

He explores a scenario where his pre-vegan self, ‘Kim the Chef’, is confronted outside the slaughterhouse by ‘Kim the Vegelical’ – waving a ‘Meat is Murder’ placard and shouting angry slogans: ‘In spite of their proximity and the fact that the conscience of Kim the Chef might have been unwittingly stirred by Kim the Vegelical’s protest, neither Kim is actually communicating with or seeing the other.’

However, Stallwood doesn’t dismiss angry protest as useless: ‘Remember. Compassion doesn’t have to be passive or even polite; compunction sometimes requires a rude awakening. Moral shocks are, by their very nature, unwelcome.’

The reviewer, Erica Smith, concludes

Throughout his long career as an animal campaigner, Stallwood has learned from the successes and failures of human rights campaigns. And 40 years of campaigning means that there are lessons to be learned – and experience to be fed back into the wider sphere of nonviolent action, making this an excellent resource for any nonviolent campaigner.

It’s a great honour to have Peace News publish such a positive review of Growl and highlight how its message of four key values (compassion, truth, nonviolence, justice) will resonate with social justice campaigners.

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Animal Liberation 40 Years On

June 9th, 2015 No comments
This is the cover of the first edition of Animal Liberation by Peter Singer published by New York Review Book in 1975.

This is the cover of the first edition of Animal Liberation by Peter Singer published by New York Review Book in 1975.

In 1975 Peter Singer published Animal Liberation, which became one of the impulses for the contemporary animal rights movement. Singer is a utilitarian philosopher and the moral philosophy he espouses in Animal Liberation is based upon the recognition of sentience in nonhuman animals and the consequent necessity that their interests ought to be included in any decision making.

If a being suffers there can be no moral justification for refusing to take that suffering into consideration. No matter what the nature of the being, the principle of equality requires that its suffering be counted equally with the like suffering—insofar as rough comparisons can be made—of any other being. If a being is not capable of suffering, or of experiencing enjoyment or happiness, there is nothing to be taken into account. So the limit of sentience (using the term as a convenient if not strictly accurate shorthand for the capacity to suffer and/or experience enjoyment) is the only defensible boundary of concern for the interests of others. To mark this boundary by some other characteristic like intelligence or rationality would be to mark it in an arbitrary manner. Why not choose some other characteristic, like skin colour? (9)

It was not until 1983 and the publication of The Case for Animal Rights by Tom Regan that we had a comprehensive and thorough account for moral rights for nonhuman animals. Utilitarianism and the natural rights view, along with ecofeminsim, have become the three traditions in Animal Ethics.

The University of Rennes recently held a conference, La Liberation Animale: Quarante ans plus tard, to

return to the link between the animal liberation movement and the theories of Peter Singer who, rightly or wrongly, is seen as its founding father. How was Singer’s animal ethics greeted after the publication of Animal Liberation? What feedback did it get from the animal rights movement? What are the conceptual and practical developments of contemporary animal liberation? What place does the utilitarian doctrine and its consequentialist basis occupy in the work of Singer and in the discussion it generated? What are the approaches in animal ethics to which Singer’s publication led?

The keynote speakers were Peter Singer and philosophers Lori Gruen, Jean-Yves Goffi, and Tatjana Visak. The presentations were roughly divided between French and English. I couldn’t understand the former. My French is limited to ordering coffee or beer. I also had trouble with the latter. I’m self-taught in philosophy and unfamiliar with some of the ideas and issues discussed–even when they were in English! Nonetheless, I appreciated listening to Peter Singer’s assessment of the impact of Animal Liberation forty years on and Lori Gruen’s description of entangled empathy as an alternative animal ethic.

Here's the cover of my much-read copy of Practical Ethics by Peter Singer. It still contains as a book mark the receipt from Foyles book shop when I bought it on March 3, 1981 for £2.95.

Here’s the cover of my much-read copy of Practical Ethics by Peter Singer. It still contains as a book mark the receipt from Foyles book shop when I bought it on March 3, 1981 for £2.95.

I was honoured to be selected–perhaps even as the only speaker who isn’t a philosopher–to present at the conference. My presentation, in a workshop called “Law and Politics,” was a specially adapted version of my talk, “Animal Liberation: Moral Crusade or Political Movement?”

I recalled my working with Peter Singer since the 1970s and 1980s and how reading Animal Liberation and Practical Ethics had been influential in my understanding of animal rights. I recommend Practical Ethics as an overview of Peter’s philosophy as it relates to such issues as abortion and euthanasia. Subsequent revised editions have been published.

I described how my thinking in animal ethics has evolved from reading and hearing speak Singer, Regan and such ecofeminists as Carol Adams, Marti Kheel, and Lori Gruen. In short, when I speak about animal rights as a matter for the law I draw from Regan’s natural rights view but my heart is more with ecofeminism. I turn to utilitarianism to help inform my everyday decision making.

Speaking at this conference was an opportunity to recognise Peter Singer as more than just the author of Animal Liberation. While I made it clear that I don’t always agree with everything that he says and writes, for example, I don’t identify as a utilitarian, I recognise Peter as a philosopher whose influence is significant. Particularly I admire how he addresses such issues as environmental protection, climate, poverty, world hunger, and the effectiveness of charities while situating animal liberation as part of these issues which, in turn, is part of a larger, progressive agenda of social change.

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Book Review: Moti by Christine Townend

March 11th, 2015 No comments
Moti--An Indian Elephant by Christine Townend

Moti–An Indian Elephant by Christine Townend

Generally elephants fascinate me but one particular elephant has a special place in my heart. She is Topsy who was an Asian elephant killed by electrocution at New York’s Coney Island in 1903. She was murdered because she killed people through no fault of her own. She was a wild animal who people misjudged they could tame by dominating her. But, as I say in my presentations about Topsy: Yes, you can take wild animals out of the wild and believe they can be tamed. But you cannot take the wild out of a wild animal and make them tame. Topsy preoccupies my mind as I write her biography.

I gave my Topsy presentation at the third Minding Animals International (MAC3) conference in India in January and was discussing it with my MAI colleague, Rod Bennison, when he said that I must read a book called Moti by Christine Townend.

I first came into contact with Christine when I edited the Coordinating Animal Welfare bulletin in the 1970s and 1980s. Since then she was synonymous in my mind with Australia and animal activism but we had never met. Until the MAC3 conference when we did meet and I learnt about her book Moti: An Indian Elephant. Christine graciously made generous remarks about my presentation on Topsy.

Christine’s book is a novel about an elephant called Moti. She is the protagonist. Books, films, art and other creative expressions through the experiences of others other than humans are not always successful. They can be ridiculous, absurd, sentimental, incredulous, silly, etc. To succeed there must be, of course, a unique creativity that makes it special but also knowledge, insight and wisdom to make it believable. This helps to explain why, for example, such books as Watership Down by Richard Adams were so popular. The author knew what he was writing about because he had studied rabbits in the place where the novel was set. It helped greatly that he was a genius in telling a story. Further, I recall chairing a meeting at which Richard Adams was a guest speaker. In person, he was as entertaining as he was intimidating!

Anyway, I approached Moti with some caution because I was unsure as to whether it would be any good or not. I soon realised, however, that Christine had written a very special novel.

I read it slowly because it was a difficult book to read. Not difficult because it isn’t well written because it is. Not difficult because it is sentimental because it isn’t. It’s a difficult book because it’s a surprisingly damn fine book. Christine puts you into the lives of elephants. You know that because it’s a human-dominated world in which the elephants live and that’s why it’s going to be a difficult novel to read.

The elephants we saw--like Moti--at Amer Fort near Jaipur in Rajasthan.

The elephants we saw–like Moti–at Amer Fort near Jaipur in Rajasthan.

I don’t want to give the narrative away. Except to say that at one point Moti is an elephant who works with others carrying tourists up to the Amer Palace near Jaipur in Rajasthan. I visited Amer Palace after MAC3 and saw the elephants carrying the tourists up the mountain to the palace. (Me and my tour group from MAC3 went by jeep.) Even though I hated what the elephants were doing it was thrilling nonetheless to see them and be so close. How I wish I had read Moti by then and could have imagined her to be one of the elephants I saw.

Christine’s decades of work for animals in Australia and India and in particular her personal knowledge of elephants inform Moti to make it a compelling read. There’s much I could quote but there’s one aspect I’d like to focus on because I found it to be so intriguing.

At the beginning of Chapter Two, we’re introduced to the Elephant Mind.

Each elephant in our herd had her own gifts, her own skills, her own beauty. And over and above all the individual expressions of elephants, there was this template, this blueprint of the past of all elephants, our God, our Elephant Mind, the chitta and, although we could not see it, within that blueprint was also our future, the future of our kind, our elephant nature, our elephant being. (p. 21)

Later, in Chapter Six, Moti is in conversation with the Matriarch of her elephant tribe, who explains to Moti

‘You see dear,’ she answered, ‘we can’t judge things in a human way. You’re trying to ask the future for something to happen. This is how humans do things. They develop a desire and then do evil to make it happen. But elephants are not humans. Let’s be free of aims. Let the sensations of this phenomenal world wash over you — appreciate the touch of wind, the scent of the grasshoppers, the resonances of trees. Don’t live in the human dimension, the smudged dimension of wants and desires, where the mind is the driving force which makes things to happen, things which may not be good, which may not be natural. Let the movement of Life itself resolve events.’ (p. 60)

My fascination with elephants deepened after reading Moti. We know elephants communicate in ways which we’re unable to hear and ways in which we’re unable to know and at great distances that beg our disbelief. But what if the Elephant Mind, along with what Christine calls the Great Elephant Soul, are real? What if elephants communicate with each other in ways that make ours seem parochial and pedestrian?

Great fiction takes us to places in which we can only imagine. Christine Townend’s Moti took me to where I could imagine elephants in touch with each other in ways unimaginable to me. In doing so, Moti further strengthened my commitment to Topsy and the injustice she endured and in telling her life story so that it’s never forgotten.

How to Order Moti

Moti, An Indian Elephant is available from Help in Suffering at a cost of $US20 which includes postage and handling. All proceeds from the sale of the book go to Help in Suffering. After depositing the payment, please inform Mr. Nirmal Jain at that you have transferred money for purchase of the book.
Account Name: Help in Suffering
Account Number: 20085900605
Bank: Bank of Maharashtra
Bank Address: Park Street, MI Road, Jaipur, 302001

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Year in Review for 2014

December 30th, 2014 No comments
Here I am in my office among the more than 2,000 books in my archive. Photo credit: Paul Knight

Here I am in my office among the more than 2,000 books in my archive. Photo: Paul Knight

This has been an extremely busy year for me and my work for animal rights as an advocate for animals who is an author and independent scholar.

The year’s highlight was the publication of Growl by Lantern Books. Part memoir and part manifesto, Growl is the book I wish I could’ve read when I first became a vegetarian, animal rights activist in 1974.

Many of my activities this year were centred around Growl and its publication and promotion, including a three-week, six-city trip to the USA.

To learn more about my year in animal rights please visit this special page. I also reveal my plans for 2015.

It’s important for me to recognise here the many friends and colleagues as well as a significant number of like-minded organisations who I have had the honour to work with throughout 2014 toward our shared mission of ending animal exploitation. In particular, I wish to thank the kind contributors to my Indiegogo campaign whose generosity helped to make possible my animal rights work this year. Thank you!

To keep up to date with me and work for animal rights, please follow me on my social media:

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My Travels in the USA

November 12th, 2014 No comments
Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth edited by Carol Adams and Lori Gruen (Bloomsbury)

Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth edited by Carol Adams and Lori Gruen (Bloomsbury)

Now that I’m at the end of the second week of my three week trip to the USA, it’s time for a further update on my activities. For example, in New York City I:

  • Spoke about animal rights to some 60 students at Pace University in two Ethics in the Work Place classes and one Animal Law class with Professors Len Mitchell and David Cassuto respectively
  • Met with and called ASI supporters and colleagues from the animal rights movement
  • Got together again with Mariann Sullivan and met for the first time Jasmin Singer from Our Hen House, who took me to a fundraising event in support of Mercy for Animals called Art of Compassion
  • Recorded a radio interview with Caryn Hartglass for her radio show, Real Radio
  • Filmed an interview with Nancy Kogel of Reaching Out for Animal Rights for a documentary she is making
  • Met with attorneys David Wolfson and Sarah Griffin from Milbank about Minding Animals International
  • Spoke to a packed room of some 100 people at Bluestockings radical bookstore to launch the new anthology, Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth edited by Carol Adams and Lori Gruen (Bloomsbury) along with Carol and fellow contributors pattrice jones and Sunny Taylor

I left New York City Friday afternoon for Baltimore for the second stage of my six-city, three week itinerary. My next update will focus on my activities in Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington DC during this week. On Saturday, I leave Baltimore for the final stage in my itinerary in Portland, ME and Boston, which I will also share with you later.

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