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News from Growl!

September 19th, 2014 1 comment

In six weeks time on Thursday, October 30 I will be in New York City as the guest of the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University making a presentation about Growl and the issues that I raise in my book. This date marks the beginning of a three-week working visit to the East Coast of the USA.

My recent Indiegogo campaign helped to raise the funds needed to make possible the following itinerary. I want to express my sincere thanks to everyone who generously contributed. Thank you!

Additional dates to my itinerary are being finalised. Please visit the Events section on this website to keep up to date with the latest news and information.

Please know your generous support of my Indiegogo campaign also helped to make possible my presentations at the following:

And between now and leaving for the USA in six weeks, I will be also speaking at:

Please watch my presentation at the International Animal Rights Conference in Luxembourg here.

I will be back in touch soon with further updates, including announcements about book clubs reading Growl and more public events.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you’re interested in me speaking in your area or working with you on your animal rights campaigns.

Thank you for doing all that you do for the animals!

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Watch My Growl Presentation

September 15th, 2014 No comments

The presentation that I made at the recent International Animal Rights Conference in Luxembourg is now available to watch. It was called ‘Animal Witness’ at the conference but is given the name ‘Why Animals and Their Well-Being Matter to Us’ on YouTube but more importantly it reflects the essence of what I have to say in Growl.

 

To watch my presentation from the IARC 2013, please click here.

To learn where I will be presenting in the future, please visit Events on this website.

For more information about the IARC, please click here.

 

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World Day for Laboratory Animals 1984

April 23rd, 2014 No comments
In London's Trafalgar Square on World Day for Laboratory Animals in 1984.

In London’s Trafalgar Square on World Day for Laboratory Animals in 1984.

Thirty years ago in London’s Trafalgar Square, I was the lead organiser of a national demonstration to recognise World Day for Laboratory Animals, when I was Campaigns Officer at the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection.

The protest was at that point in time the world’s largest animal rights demonstration with nine thousand people, with the greatest number ever involved–six hundred–in street theatre.

Under BUAV’s hallmark slogan of ‘Every Six Seconds an Animal Dies in a British Laboratory’, we constructed a large doorway, which was painted to represent an entrance to a vivisection laboratory. We dressed a couple of people as vivisectors, with bloodstained white coats, and stationed them by the doorway. From the plinth at the Square, we announced that for the ninety minutes of speeches and music a tape loop would play the sound of a bell chiming every six seconds. Each time the bell rang, large numbers were turned on the stage to count to six hundred while one of the vivisectors took a protester through the door, ‘killed’ them in front of the plinth, and laid them on the ground as dead animals. Eventually, the area was filled with 600 ‘dead animals’.

At the 1984 World Day for Laboratory Animals demonstration in London's Trafalgar Square, I help Sue Croshaw speak out as a disabled person against animal experimentation by holding the microphone stand.

At the 1984 World Day for Laboratory Animals demonstration in London’s Trafalgar Square, I help Sue Croshaw speak out as a disabled person against animal experimentation by holding the microphone stand.

This protest was part of a coalition, the Mobilisation of Animals, which opposed the government’s proposed legislation to replace the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876. The coalition consisted of Animal Aid, Scottish Anti-Vivisection Society, National Anti-Vivisection Society, and BUAV. We opposed the proposed law because it wouldn’t even ban particularly egregious examples of animal experimentation—such as using animals for testing the negative effects of tobacco and alcohol, and the toxicity of cosmetics, as well as employing animals in research for military and psychological purposes. These experiments had been the focus of the 1979 and 1983 General Election Coordinating Committee for Animal Protection campaigns I helped to lead. We organised a lobby of Parliament, which was attended by seven hundred people, and a rally, emceed by myself, with sympathetic Members of Parliament of all political parties, and others.

Although the government ignored our demands on the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, I believe BUAV and its companion organisations succeeded in highlighting what needed to be done when the new legislation was enforced. For example, the U.K. government subsequently banned the testing of cosmetics on animals in 1997 and the LD50 oral toxicity test in 2001. In 2003, the European Union agreed to a membership-wide ban on cosmetics animal testing by 2013.

The Talon Conspiracy, an online archive preserving the history of protest movements for animal rights and environmentalism, offers an opportunity to read back copies of BUAV’s ‘campaigning newspaper,’ The Liberator, which I co-edited. Here’s the link to the issue which included a report on the Trafalgar Square demonstration.

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Animal Pasts in Hyde Park

October 14th, 2013 No comments
Although this horse stables in a nearby mews is relatively recent, London's Hyde Park has a long history involving horses and less recently sheep and cows.

Although this horse stables in a nearby mews is relatively recent, London’s Hyde Park has a long history involving horses and less recently sheep and cows.

On Saturday, October 12, I joined with 12 others on a walk, Animal Pasts in Hyde Park, led by historian Hilda Kean in London. This is the second walk I’ve taken led by Hilda. Here is my account of the first ‘Animal Pasts in London’s Landscape Today‘. Among Hilda’s books is Animal Rights. Political and Social Change in Britain since 1800, which I highly recommend.

‘Hyde Park is not just a site of human demonstrations and concerts,’ explained Hilda. ‘It is a space in which animals have also lived, died and been remembered and not only at the Animals in War memorial in Park Lane.’

Seen in the distance are the gravestones of the Hyde Park Dog Cemetery.

Seen in the distance are the gravestones of the Hyde Park Dog Cemetery.

Britain’s first pet cemetery is in Hyde Park. Although we were unable to gain access, the headstones were visible through the wrought iron fence. Hilda writes about the Hyde Park Dog Cemetery on her website:

It was originally called (it also admitted the corpses of three small monkeys, and two cats) was established in 1880 in the part of the huge park that lies adjacent to Kensington Gardens (and opposite Lancaster Gate). Although accounts vary as to the origins of the cemetery – either initiated by the Duke of Connaught or through a favour of the gatekeeper to friends who lived nearby – it is evident that the cemetery was not run for profit but as a philanthropic gesture towards grieving animal owners.

The walking tour also included two cattle troughs, the memorial for a defunct bird sanctuary which featured Epstein’s figure of ‘Rima,’ the bird-girl heroine of W. H. Hudson’s novel, ‘Green Mansions.’ The tour ended at the Animals in War Memorial on Park Lane immediately adjacent and to the east of Hyde Park.

This video is raw footage I shot with my iPad. The Animals in War Memorial is situated in the middle of a very busy road, Park Lane, with each side having at least two lanes of traffic, including many buses and coaches. So, the audio quality is not great but does improve. In any event, it is possible to hear Hilda Kean speak about the memorial and see it and how it is situated.

embedded by Embedded Video

YouTube Direkt

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IARC 2013

September 15th, 2013 No comments
The IARC 2013 was held at the Kulturfabrik that was originally a slaughterhouse. Here, we look up at the ceiling to see the large hooks that moved the carcasses along the production line.

The IARC 2013 was held at the Kulturfabrik that was originally a slaughterhouse. Here, we look up at the ceiling to see the large hooks that moved the carcasses along the production line.

The International Animal Rights Conference in Luxembourg is an impressive event. It attracts animal advocates from across the world and produces an impressive program of speakers. It is also well organised and comprehensive and welcoming. Generally, the attendees are younger activists. They are thoughtful and passionate.

The conference is held at the Centre Culturel Kulturfabrik Esch which was formally a slaughterhouse and is now an arts complex with a restaurant, galleries, offices, and studios. I was not aware of this until I arrived and it was pointed out to me. So, attending the conference becomes a bizarre but creepy positive experience in that animal rights was being discussed inside an old slaughterhouse.

I was honoured with making the opening plenary presentation. I decided to present the paper I had written for the academic journal, Relations. This is because the paper, ‘Animal rights: Moral crusade or political movement?’, summarised my critique of the animal rights movement. Other presenters also addressed related issues about the movement’s ideology and strategy.

The conference organisers have opened a page in YouTube where it is possible to watch many if not all of the presentations made. These recordings are a valuable resource into the different views and perspectives made about animal rights and its ideology and strategy.

You can watch my presentation here. Please share with me your thoughts and comments on my thesis that the animal rights movement should be less like a moral crusade and more like a political movement. Thank you!

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Back in the USA

October 19th, 2012 No comments

A Conference Honoring the Ecofeminist Work of Marti Kheel at Wesleyan University, New York in November 2012.

Presently, I am preparing to make a return visit to the USA from Thursday, November 8 to Saturday, December 1. This will be my second trip to the USA since leaving five years ago after living and working there for 20 years. I am looking forward to the trip very much. I grew to appreciate the USA notwithstanding its annoyances. Well, everywhere does have them, including the UK where I live now!

It will be a busy three week and three day schedule, which I would like to share with you. I would love to see everyone again who I enjoyed meeting during my time there. But, realistically, that won’t be possible. Nevertheless, send me an email at kim@kimstallwood.co and let’s see if we can schedule a telephone or Skype call while I’m there. Better still, please get in touch to see if it’s possible to meet in the places which I will be visiting or at the events where I will be speaking.

Conference Honoring the Ecofeminist Work of Marti Kheel

This conference from November 9 to 10 at Wesleyan University in Connecticut will celebrate the unique contribution Marti made in developing our understanding of animal ethics and, in particular, ecofeminism. I will be presenting as a member of a panel looking at the practice of advocacy. My focus will be on the impact ecofeminism made on my understanding of what form animal advocacy should take. The line up of speakers at this conference is truly outstanding. To single anyone out would be unfair to everyone else. I am truly honoured to be part of it.

New York City

I will be in NYC the week of November 12 and would like to see as many people as possible. Drop me an email. I will be spending Thanksgiving week with Sue Coe, which will hopefully involve lots of eating, walking the dogs in the woods and arguments about this and that.

Michigan

The remainder of my trip is spent with my colleagues at the Animals and Society Institute, which is based in Ann Arbor, MI. I will be spending Monday, November 26 to Thursday, November 29 particularly with Bee Friedlander but I suspect there’s going to be a reunion of sorts of ASI folks taking place! On Monday, I will be joining Bee when she makes a presentation at the University of Michigan Dearborn and to the class of Fran Dolins, professor of psychology. Also during this time I will be speaking with ASI supporters to catch up and thank them for all that they do for the animals.

Yours truly will be speaking the evening before the Michigan Partnership for Animal Welfare conference on Thursday, November 29 in Troy, MI.

On Thursday evening, I am the featured speaker at the Troy Marriott where I will consider ‘What It Means to Care Deeply About Animals.’ (You can book here.)

My presentation is the pre-event to the annual Michigan Partnership for Animal Welfare conference. I will be speaking here, as well, and will be discussing ‘USA – UK: Who is Making More Progress in Animal Welfare?’ Provocative, eh!

I am also putting to the bed the manuscript for my first book which will be published by Lantern Books next year. It’s been a longtime coming. The only thing I want to say about it now is that it is my intention to return to the USA in 2013 to travel throughout the country to share with folks the ideas I explore in my book. This tour will be produced in partnership with the Animals and Society Institute. ASI is very dear to my heart because one of our objectives is to help further establish Human-Animal Studies. HAS is the study of our relationship with animals and theirs with us. I firmly believe moral and legal rights for animals will be made even more possible with new generations of academics and scientists informed in animal studies playing prominent roles in society. I also want to partner with other animal groups. Please get in touch if you’re interested.

This book, which started life as Animal Dharma, has gone through many changes. You can read earlier extracts here.

So, if we fail to connect this year, well, there’s always 2013!

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Animal Pasts in London’s Landscape Today

October 2nd, 2012 No comments

On Saturday, September 29, I was lucky to be part of a walking group led by historian Hilda Kean which explored ‘Animal Pasts in London’s Landscape Today.’ As Hilda writes on her Web site,

Alongside our human ancestors animals have created the physical and cultural landscape of London as it exists today. In this walk of c. 2 hours we will look at traces left by cattle, horses, dogs and cats – and their human companions. Skirting the city, this walk will  offer a different way of seeing London.

This video shows how we started at Smithfield Market. It began as a place where once live farmed animals were brought, bought, sold and killed to a meat market today. Hilda read out from Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist,

It was market-morning. The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily yabove. All the pens in the centre of the large area, and as many temporary pens as could be crowded into the vacant space, were filled with sheep; tied up to posts by the gutter side were long lines of beasts and oxen, three or four deep.

Smithfield is on the borders of the City, whixh is a place of many histories. For example, St Bartholomew’s, the oldest hospital in London, was founded here by Rahere in 1123. It was a site of executions and Protestant martyrs were burnt to death, including William Wallace and Wat Tyler. The live trade in cattle from C12 to 1860s led ironically to the first legislation in the world to protect animals in 1822, when it became illegal to ‘wantonly and cruelly beat abuse, or ill treat any horse, mare, gelding, mule, ass, ox, cow , heifer, steer, sheep, or other cattle.’

Samuel Johnson’s cat, Hodge, as represented by sculptor Jon Bickley in 1997.

On our way to Samuel Johnson’s house in Gough Square, Hilda pointed several key landmarks and buildings, which I will tease you with by saying, dear reader, you will need to join Hilda on a future tour to find out! Samuel Johnson, the famous essayist, lived in a house in Gough Square, between 1749 – 59, which was during the period when he published his famous dictionary. Dr Johnson opposed cruelty to animals, including vivisection which he defined as perpetrated ‘by a race of men that have practised tortures without pity.’ He also loved cats. One of them, Hodge, was described by Johnson as a ‘very fine cat, a very fine cat indeed.’ Here is a link to an extract of a videoI shot of Hilda telling us about Hodge.

Sam, who had all the ideas.

Later on the walk, we saw another statue dedicated to a cat. This was Sam. Sam, who was a real cat who lived with Patricia Penn, and is now commemorated in sculpture by John Fuller in Queen Square. Penny, as she was known, was a local campaigner and active in the residents association. Penny and Sam lived nearby. Apparently when Penny wanted to reveal something or spread an idea, she’d say ‘Sam heard … or Sam has had an idea.’ We also visited another statue dedicated to a cat, Humphrey. Click on this linkto watch Hilda explain who Humphrey was.

I took this photo looking up to the door which horses were taken through. I am standing on the corridor leading down to the lower flower looking up at the front door. The cobbled steps, which were installed to help make it easier for the horses to walk, are clearly visible.

The last but one site we visited was what used to be the horse hospital but is now an art gallery on the lower floor and the contemporary wardrobe collection on the upper floor. The horse hospital is located at the rear of Russell Hotel in Herbrand Street and Colonnade. It was built by architect James Burton in 1797, who also built the Veterinary College in St Pancras and then redeveloped after 1860. Now a grade 11 listed arts centre, the interior still contains the moulded ramps and cobbled floor which enabled horses to walk from the bottom to be treated on the first floor. Apologies for this brief account of what was a fascinating two-hour plus walk through central London. Please visit Hilda’s Web site to learn more about her various projects in animal rights and other histories. Her book on the history of animal rights is also highly recommended. It is called ‘Animal Rights’ and is published by Reaktion. Please also check out this link. It is to a video of Hilda making a presentation at a recent conference of the International Society of Anthrozoology called, ‘The Changing Human-Feline Relationship in Britain c.1900-1950.’

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Minding Animals 2 Utrecht

July 12th, 2012 No comments

Minding Animals

Nearly one week ago I returned to England from the Netherlands where I attended the second international Minding Animals conference at the University of Utrecht. Although I have been incredibly busy between then and now, the luxury of these few days distance offers me an opportunity to reflect and consider what it all meant to me. I’m grabbing sometime now before it’s too late to commit my thoughts to paper, er, virtual paper. Otherwise it will be too late. The memories and feelings will soon dissipate.

Let me be abundantly clear. As Deputy Chief Executive to Minding Animals International, this post reflects my personal views. Not the opinions of MAI or anyone else associated with the project. Having said that, I’m confident that some of my colleagues will agree with me here (and there). But it’s up to them to share their own thoughts. By the way, MAI Deputy CEO is a voluntary position. (As is CEO, which is held by Rod Bennison.) I paid to attend MAI2 myself. All the costs were met by me, except for conference registration, which was complementary.

I was unable to attend the first Minding Animals conference in Newcastle, Australia three years ago. Various reasons prevented me from going. Everyone I speak to who did describe it as a transformative event. Several reasons are given. The first event of its kind. The smooth organisation. The opportunity to meet at last with people who folks have been only in contact with via email. And so on.

MAI2 had a tough act to follow. During the intervening three years, there had been much progress in the development of Animal Studies and animal advocacy generally. Of course, Animal Studies is not a monolith. Even though it is still a relatively small and emerging academic discipline, I think of Animal Studies as an umbrella name for various strands of academic thinking that fall under it, including Human-Animal Studies, Critical Animal Studies and Animalia Studies. These differences are important but it’s not necessary for my purposes here to explore them.

Suffice it to say, folks representing the various strands of Animal Studies were present at MAI2. It is not surprising, therefore, that this caused some disagreement among the delegates over the program. I am not going to go into here but the organisation behind MAI2 was a complicated affair. The conference convenor, Tatjana Visak, worked incredibly hard to make sure the conference was a success. In my book, Tatjana is a hero whose attitude and professionalism were exemplary.

Nevertheless, as is perhaps to be expected with a new venture with 700 people in attendance, it was a hugely complicated meeting to organise. I know from my own experience of organising lobbies on Parliament, workshops, conferences, demonstrations and much else besides, that sometimes things simply do not go as they planned. But there were also somethings that were planned that I disagreed with. As I say, the organisation behind MAI2 was a complicated affair. In any event, everyone’s feedback was considered, noted and will be used to help improve future MAI events and activities.

So, which thoughts about MAI2 linger with me one week later?

First, the confirmation that Animal Studies is alive and well and growing as an academic enterprise. It is vibrant with a kaleidoscope of perspectives, disciplines, interests and possibilities. Given how our confused and complex our relationship is with other animal, the inter-disciplinary nature of Animal Studies is not only necessary but exciting.

Second, the development of political theory and animal rights. As Ken Shapiro, my colleague at the Animals and Society Institute pointed out, it was necessary for the modern animal rights movement to devote a chapter in its formative stage to animal ethics. This was needed to lay a foundation of moral understanding which, in turn, facilitated a further stage of political theory and animal rights. The plenary session with Robert Garner and Will Kymlicka was fascinating. Together with Siobhan O’Sullivan and others developing political theory and animal rights, I am encouraged that the animal rights movement might yet have a chance of making animal rights a mainstream political issue.

Third, the importance of conferences in of themselves as opportunities to meet and reacquaint ourselves with each other as well as indulge in time and space to think, chat, argue and learn.

Finally, Utrecht is a stunningly impressive city. This was my first visit. It appears to be a very civilised city. But watch out for the bicyclists.

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Critical Perspectives on Animals in Society Conference

March 12th, 2012 2 comments

Richard Ryder speaking at the Critical Perspectives on Animals in Society conference at Exeter University.

The Critical Perspectives on Animals in Society Conference took place on Saturday, March 10 at the University of Exeter. It was organised by a group of scholars based at various universities throughout Britain. About 150 students, teachers, animal advocates and authors were in attendance. Presentations included speakers not only based in the United Kingdom but also the European Union.

My presentation, ‘Animal Rights: Moral Crusade or Political Movement?‘, is available to read here.

Long-standing animal advocate and author, Richard D. Ryder, gave the keynote presentation. He focused on key issues to successful campaigns, drawing from examples of successful initiatives from his many decades of activities. Other presentations explored such issues as animal law, the badger ‘cull’, representation of animals in the Bible and Marxism and a social theory of animal liberation.

The organisers are to be congratulated on a very successful and informative conference.

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